Sportex Time-saving marketing resources for physical & manual therapists

tennis

  • Tennis Injuries: Social Media and Lead Generation Campaign

    20 pieces of social media (images and text) on the topic of tennis injuries, which you can post to Facebook or Twitter using our simple 4-step scheduling tool. Each piece of social media links to a email lead collection form where people can sign up to receive the resources. Once they have entered their details, we collect those email details for you, and deliver them to the resources they have signed up to receive. This campaign also includes 4 'lead magnets' (high value pieces of content) which your viewers can download once they've entered their email address (don't worry, we take care of the whole process for you). All you need to do is schedule the social media to be sent to your social networks. Use the campaign to build your email list and build reputation and authority by publishing some super-helpful content to your social networks.

    To try out a free campaign and see how it works, just login or register an account below and visit the Campaigns section in the My Account panel.

  • The Clinician's Guide to Managing Tennis Elbow [Article]

    Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is a common injury that is notoriously difficult to rehabilitate. This article provides a practical and progressive model for athletes to manage the condition and rehabilitate back to full function. This article is available free of charge until Weds 27th May - just Register to access it.

  • Medial tibial stress syndrome in a national tennis player: The application of functional fascial taping

    Functional fascial taping (FFT) is a treatment approach that uses sports tape to apply tension to the skin, fascia and muscles in order to pull damaged structures back into alignment. The author of this article has pioneered and developed this technique, which has been used to treat a wide range of conditions such as plantar fasciitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, back, neck and shoulder pain, muscle tears and repetitive strain injury. This article demonstrates the use of FFT on a tennis player suffering from medial tibial stress syndrome.