Sportex Time-saving resources for physical & manual therapists

football

  • Patient Information Leaflet: Hamstring Strains in Football/Soccer [Printable leaflet]

    This advice leaflet outlines how hamstring strains can occur in football/soccer, what's going on inside, what can be done, and how physical therapy can help. It has been written specifically for patients. You can purchase it individually using the Purchase button below, or as part of any of the main Co-Kinetic subscriptions.

  • Patient Information Leaflet: Meniscus Injury in Football/Soccer [Printable leaflet]

    This advice leaflet outlines how a meniscus injury can occur in football/soccer, what's going on inside, what can be done, and how physical therapy can help. It has been written specifically for patients. You can purchase it individually using the Purchase button below, or as part of any of the main Co-Kinetic subscriptions.

  • Soccer Injuries: A Content Marketing Campaign for Therapists [Premium/Full Site Subscription]

    An all-in-one marketing strategy with content, that you can use to promote yourself and your business to people with an interest in soccer. It includes ready-to-post social media content (including videos) to help you collect new email leads through your social media channels. There's a pre-written blog post to make you more findable on Google, a pre-written email to help you nurture relationships with your existing email contacts, PowerPoint presentations, posters, and loads more resources to help you convert your email prospects into paying customers

    Login, or register a free account below, to download free social media content and watch a video talking you through the kit contents in more detail (no subscription needed).

  • Football Injuries: A Content Marketing Campaign for Therapists [Premium/Full Site Subscription]

    An all-in-one marketing strategy with content, that you can use to promote yourself and your business to people who play football. It includes ready-to-post social media content (including videos) to help you collect new email leads through your social media channels. There's a pre-written blog post to make you more findable on Google, a pre-written email to help you nurture relationships with your existing email contacts, PowerPoint presentations, posters, and loads more resources to help you convert your email prospects into paying customers

    Login, or register a free account below, to download free social media content and watch a video talking you through the kit contents in more detail (no subscription needed).

  • Football Injuries in Numbers Infographic

    The latest infographic that we created for the Football Injury Content Marketing Campaign for Therapists. Check it out in full here - OPEN ACCESS.

  • Soccer Injuries in Numbers Infographic

    The latest infographic created by Co-Kinetic for the Soccer Injury Content Marketing Campaign for Therapists. Check it out in full here - OPEN ACCESS.

  • Football/Soccer Injury Patient Information Resources

    Rebrandable client resources covering the 6 most common football/soccer injuries. We've done two versions of each leaflet, one referring to soccer and one referring to football :-). The injuries included are: ACL Injury; Groin Pain; Hamstring Strain; Contusions; Ankle Sprains; Meniscus Injury. For more information about branding this content click here. You can download some free social media and a couple of patient leaflets by logging in or registering a free account below (no subscription required).

    These leaflets are included in all our monthly subscriptions or they can be purchased individually using the purchase button below.

  • 5 Evidence-Based Strategies for Reducing Injury Rates in Professional Football [Article]

    Injury prevention is personal. Generic preventative exercise programmes are likely to modify some risk factors of injury, but the evidence proves that an individualised programme, designed specifically for each player, is considerably more effective. The first article in this series discussed risk factors of injury and outlined clinical tests that can screen for these risk factors, providing normative data to enable the medical team to identify those players at risk of injury. This article covers the next challenge which is to establish the best method for modifying these risk factors. It outlines the basic principles of designing an injury prevention programme, and examines the current research on the most commonly used methods in the field of injury prevention. This article contains a number of PDF exercise programmes, tables and a certificated elearning quiz.

  • How to Reduce Injury Rates in Professional Football using Surveillance and Screening [Article]

    We all know injuries are bad news in all sports, but in football an injury can have particularly far-reaching effects which is why surveillance and screening programmes are essential. Not only does an injury have an adverse affect on the player, causing a range of emotional responses that can then unmask other more serious mental health issues (see the ‘Related content’ box) but just as importantly, if the athlete is a team player which footballers obviously are, the consequences can and do escalate to affect the whole team and, even worse, its performance (1). Our job as physical therapists is to do our utmost to ensure injuries don’t happen on our watch and one of the most powerful tools we have in our armoury for achieving this is injury screening and injury surveillance. This article reviews the evidence supporting the importance of surveillance and screening programmes in football, outlines some of the evidence-based screening tests, and offers some practical steps on constructing a programme, as well as enhancing or developing an existing one. And if you have ‘seniors’ who don’t yet appreciate the significance of this area of medical care, we will also arm you with some excellent research to help you support and justify the need to implement a surveillance and screening programme for your team.

  • Proximal Biceps Tendon Rupture of the Hamstring: A Case Study [Article]

    Working in a multidisciplinary team can be frustrating and difficult at times. Creating a team requires a clear strategy with objectives and boundaries and good communication. To ensure a functioning and useful team, members must be constantly aware of their working relationships with each other and the impact they have on the player and their teammates. This case study involves an elite football player in a Premier League team with a complex hamstring injury and shows how a criteria-driven rehabilitation model is a practical approach to coordinating a multidisciplinary team and helping an athlete solve problems that are limiting their rehabilitation. The article is packed with practical tables covering most elements of the rehabilitation protocol and clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of using objective markers and criteria for progression within the rehabilitation process.

  • A case study of a longitudinal medial collateral ligament sprain in a professional footballer

    This case study presents the insights gained from the presentation and treatment of a longitudinal sprain of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee in a professional footballer. MCL sprains are usually transverse and longitudinal sprains present with subtle differences. This article describes the differences in the common signs and symptoms and clinical testing to allow readers to make a differential diagnosis in their own practice.

  • Hamstring Injuries in Football Part 2: Prevention [Article]

    This article provides the reader with an evidenced-based update on the risk factors commonly associated with hamstring injuries in football. These risk factors have been classified into two groups: non-modifiable and modifiable. Additionally, the reader is provided with a detailed insight of the prevention strategies and interventions used to nullify the modifiable risk factors and ultimately reduce hamstring injury rates.

  • Management of acute patella dislocation: case study

    This article describes a case study of the diagnosis, assessment and rehabilitation of a youth team footballer who sustained an acute patella dislocation. The study includes all the information needed to effectively rehabilitate players including the mechanism of injury, risk factors, a needs analysis for the sport, problems identified and evidence-based management. A successful, logical and evidence-based rehabilitation programme is presented, and objective measurement with an evidence base is detailed throughout.

  • Hamstring Injuries in Football Part 1: Assessment, Diagnosis and Prognosis [Article]

    This article provides an update on the current available evidence on the assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis of hamstring injuries in soccer. After a detailed insight into the epidemiology, functional anatomy, and injury mechanism for hamstring injuries, a detailed clinical examination, which is supported by clinical evidence, clinical experience and innovative practice, is demonstrated. Finally the recent Munich classification system is presented to improve clarity of communication for diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic purposes.

  • Functional screening of a semi-professional footballer: a case analysis

    This article highlights that a simple approach, in terms of combining a literature-based analysis with practical assessment methods, could determine a subject’s physical status in terms of susceptibility to injury in their given sport. After such an analysis, the pre-participation physical examination can be refined greatly in order to highlight any injury risk factors associated with an athlete, which helps to limit the potential time required to assess an entire team.

  • Spontaneous Rupture of the Plantar Fascia in a Professional Football Player [Article]

    Spontaneous rupture of the plantar fascia is not commonly presented within physiotherapy or sports injury literature. The incidence within professional football players is even rarer. This is a case report of a professional footballer who had a rupture following a short bout of moderate plantar fasciitis. The actual rupture occurred early in a competitive league game but the player completed a full 90 minutes and only missed 11 days of training going against all existing literature on the condition being debilitative in the early stages. Rupture was diagnosed through pre- and post-injury MRI. This case discusses presentation, treatment of plantar fasciitis, MRI results, and treatment and rehabilitation of the spontaneous rupture. Differences between plantar fasciitis and plantar fascia rupture are also discussed in line with MRI findings.